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Volunteers are repainting 15 panels to give the Community Patchwork Mural a makeover and restore its vibrant colours. Installation is slated for the spring or summer of 2019. The mural will be reinstated to its original home on the side of a brick building at Vankleek Hill's main intersection.

Volunteers recreating “Community Patchwork” mural in Vankleek Hill

Work has been underway for several weeks now, as volunteers, led by Lorie Turpin, have set about recreating the Community Patchwork Mural, which had undergone weathering and fading since its installation at the main intersection of Vankleek Hill several years ago.

The project is part of an overall look at restoring or at least, commemorating Vankleek Hill’s Historical Murals.

The painting work is happening in space on the second storey of Vankleek Hill’s Creating Centre, located at 12 High Street. There are 15 panels in all and work is underway on four panels at the moment, says coordinator Lorie Turpin.

Turpin is currently working on finding another space in which she can prime the pieces of plywood which are being used for the panels. She said that she did paint the first four indoors at the Creating Centre, but said that the odour from the priming paint was quite strong, so she is looking for space which has ventilation in order to expedite the priming process.

Local artist Laura Kral is repainting one of the panels for the Community Patchwork mural in Vankleek Hill.

Can you help?

No artistic talent is needed for some parts of the Community Patchwork, said Turpin, as outlines for the quilt patterns on the outside of the mural are easy to replicate for those who can paint in between the lines. Local artist Laura Kral is currently working on painting a scene with cows in it and Turpin herself is working on the portraits of those who were in an image of a group of women who were quilting.


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Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Publisher at The Review
Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!
Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!

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