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This Week in Local History – June 2, 2021 – The Review Archives

10 Years ago
VKH’s first-ever Relay for Life a remarkable success
The Review, June 1, 2011 – VANKLEEK HILL – It may have been done on a smaller scale and with fewer participants than other such events, but Vankleek Hill’s first-ever Relay for Life on Friday, May 27, was an overwhelming success. The Canadian Cancer Society’s most successful community fundraising initiative attracted 120 participants to Vankleek Hill Collegiate Institute, thanks to the organizing efforts of the high school’s students and staff.

Photo and caption reprinted from the June 1, 2011 edition of The Review.

25 Years Ago
Perley Bridge construction begins Monday
The Review, June 5, 1996 – HAWKESBURY – The moment so many people have waited for will occur Monday, June 10. Construction of a new interprovincial bridge between Hawkesbury and Grenville will be formally launched Monday during a sod-turning ceremony scheduled for 9:30 a.m. The ceremony will take place at Hawkesbury’s Maison de l’ile, located at the foot of the Perley Bridge.

50 Years Ago
Pipe band holds competition
The Review, June 2, 1971 – HAWKESBURY – The 1st Hawkesbury Boy Scout Troup Pipe Band held their first inter-band competition on Saturday evening, May 29, in the cafeteria of the Vankleek Hill Collegiate Institute. Pipe Major Reg Harden began proceedings by playing the band’s signature tune. Winner of the Sole Side Drum Learner Class 2 was Chris Cameron and second Ewan MacMillan. In Learner Class 1 and 2 the winner was Ian Seay and second Sunil Pandila. In Solo Chanter Learner Class 1 the winner was Paul Kubes and second Atul Gupta.

75 Years Ago
Lachute Fair celebrates 120th anniversary
The Review, June 6, 1946 – LACHUTE – Born in 1826 – and still going strong – but going ‘stronger than ever”, may well be the proper title for the 120th renewal of the Argenteuil Agricultural Society’s Lachute Spring Fair. Thousands of visitors throng the grounds. Some are very, very important people and in the world’s spotlight. Others are modest and unassuming, but important in their help feeding the starving millions in this war-ravaged globe.

100 Years Ago
Young farmer shot in tragic affair in Caledonia
The Review, June 3, 1921 – CALEDONIA – A tragic shooting took place about 4 o’clock on Sunday in the township of Caledonia, when Constable Ernest Johnson, of L’Orignal, shot and killed instantly Oliver George Sproule, a farmer aged 27, who is said to have been insane. When Johnson shot to kill, Sproule had a loaded revolver against the breast of Deputy-Sheriff S. W. Wright, of L’Orignal, who with Johnson had gone to arrest Sproule. The deceased was a prosperous farmer who lived alone with his brother on their farm three miles from Fournierville. About a year ago it was noticed he was acting strangely and was to be sent to an asylum after a recent diagnosis.

125 Years Ago
Liberal platform explained
The Review, June 5, 1896 – WEST HAWKESBURY – On Wednesday evening the Town Hall was packed to its fullest by the electors of the Township of West Hawkesbury, to listen to the exposition of the Liberal platform by Mr. Cloran and other speakers. The Conservative candidate was invited, but neither he nor his representative put in an appearance. Mr. Cloran for an hour and a half had the closest attention of the assemblage in his eloquent and masterly arraignment of the incompetent aggregation which styles itself the government of Canada.

Reid Masson

Reid Masson is a graduate of Algonquin College's Journalism Program. He has over 20 years of experience as a staff writer and editor for various newspapers across Canada, including The Ottawa Citizen and Brockville Recorder and Times.

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