Save the steeple of Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church

UPDATED APRIL 5, 2018

If you have missed the church bells ringing in L’Orignal recently, it is with good reason. Due to structural issues with the church steeple, the bell has remained silent, likely for safety reasons.

A press release was issued late Tuesday afternoon, April 3, advising that significant fundraising efforts will be required in order to effect the necessary repairs to the steeple. No cost has yet been determined.

The parish has been aware that there was a problem with the steeple for a few months now.  Initially, water leakage caught parishioners’ attention, and when they went to look at the source, they realized that infiltrating water had caused light to moderate damage to the metal covering on the steeple and the planks underneath.  They patched it and stopped using the bell as a precaution, worried that the vibration could cause more damage.
Experts will be assessing the damage and defining what work needs to be done and at what cost. The diocese will have to approve the work as officially, the church belongs to the diocese.
Parishioners want to protect and preserve their church and hope that the structural work needed is contained within the steeple structure itself.

Parishioners Eric and Tammy Drouin are taking the church and its heritage to heart and have offered their services to launch the fundraising campaign. They are inviting anyone who is interested in the future of the church to attend a meeting on April 19 at 7 p.m. at the church. The press releases says that parish officials will be on hand to explain the seriousness of the situation, the necessary steps related to the diocese and the need for an engineer’s inspection.

Saint-Jean-Baptiste Church is located at 1057 Queen Street in L’Orignal. It was built in 1851-52.


While you are here, we have a small ask.

More people are reading The Review than ever before — across our many platforms. So far, we have not put up a paywall to limit the stories you can read. We want to keep you in the news loop. But advertising revenues are increasingly going to the big two: you know who they are. If you value The Review’s independent, local community journalism, or you value the many ways we support dozens of community organizations in their endeavours, consider supporting our work. It takes time, effort and professional smarts to stay on top of community news and present well-researched, objective news articles on issues which matter to you.

If you read stories on this website, or you have come here from an Instant Article post on Facebook, think about subscribing. It would be a vote of confidence for the work that we do, and for the future well-being of your community.

Subscribe today?


 

Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Publisher at The Review
Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!
Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!

louise has 470 posts and counting.See all posts by louise