A transitional year to hold costs down: GSLR

In a budget presented at the end of January, an increase of eight per cent for the Municipalités régionales de comté (MRC) portion of taxes, a six per cent increase for the municipality’s  police protection (SQ) and a $101,000 increase in debt charges were listed as challenges for 2018, Grenville-sur-la-Rouge. Nonetheless, council is aiming at a zero increase in taxes for its citizens owning properties or homes of average value. Council approved the 2018 budget at a January 23, 2018 meeting.

In the presentation, the approach for 2018 is described as aiming to freeze operating costs, to reduce legal costs, to reduce council wages, do an inventory of municipal assets and push for cost control using rigorous management.

The municipality’s remittance to the MRC will be $400,493 in 2018, an increase of $25,301 from 2017, or 6.7 per cent. A table shows the annual increases from 2014, when the municipality paid $260,860 to the MRC. Since 2014, the municipality’s remittance to the MRC has increased by 53 per cent.

Policing costs will be $343,432 in 2018, compared to $303,799 in 2017.

The projected revenues from taxes in 2018 is $4,684,288, a $149,083 increase (3.29 per cent), compared to $4,535,205 in 2017. Other revenue items, including fines, interest and all other income, bring the total municipal income to $5,822,690 in 2018, an increase of $239,304 (4.29 per cent) from 2017.

Expenses are expected to be $5,475,483, compared to $5,227,343 in 2017, which translates into increased expenditures of 4.75 per cent, or $248,140.

The 2018 budget aims to reduce general administration costs by 11.82 per cent, or by $134,018, from $1,134,270 to $1,000,252.

A comparison of taxes for a residential property shows that a property valued at $125,000 in 2017 would have translated into $1,367 in municipal taxes. In 2018, that translates into property taxes equalling $1,351, for a net reduction of $15.89, or .11 per cent.

The same comparison for a $168,837 property value shows that in 2017, municipal taxes would have been $1774,14 and would be $1,762.14 in 2018, representing an $11.99 reduction (.01 per cent).

A three-year investment plan is in the works for the road network in Grenville-sur-la-Rouge. In 2018, $4,485,165 has been allotted for roads, with an additional $4,020,000 in 2019 and $4 million in 2020. In 2018, $425,000 will be spent on sewers, with another $400,000 budgeted for each of the next two years (2019 and 2020).

The municipality plans to spend $812,740 on equipment in 2018, but has no spending planned for 2019 and 2020.

There are plans to spend $1,325,000 for municipal development in 2017, with $500,000 to be spent in each of 2019 and 2020.

Other expenses included in the municipality’s three-year plan are $100,000 in 2018 and $233,561 in 2019.


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Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Publisher at The Review
Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!
Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!

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