History for the whole family: High Tea at the Macdonell-Williamson House

On Sunday, July 2, the Macdonell-Williamson House volunteers prepared a High Tea for guests to enjoy finger sandwiches, live music, and tea. Taking place at the house, the volunteers made sure the day ran smoothly so that everyone had a good time; visitors were invited to explore the history of the house. Even though the volunteers had much on their hands with a busy house and a High Tea to run, they made time to explain the history for the people on who lived there. ̒ ̒

“John Macdonell and all of his family came from Scotland and when he came, he married a Metis woman named Magdalena,” ̓ explained Sue Tessier, an active volunteer in the house. As people wandered through the parlour to the tea room to the general store, their faces lit up with curiosity.

The Macdonell-Williamson House is open Thursday to Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is three dollars, and free for children under 12. And the High Tea is not the only event that will be happening at the Macdonell-Williamson House this summer:  other events this summer include the Glengarry Twistle Guild Spinners, the Metis weekend, Macdonell-Williamson Descendants, Members, Friends reunion and a Garage Sale. The days will be filled with activities and presentations.

The Macdonell-Williamson House is loved by many. The hope to keep it standing in the years to come is passed along from volunteers to visitors.

“Why do I volunteer? Because I love the house,” said Judy Henderson, who has been volunteering since the late 1990s. “It’s a passion of mine, old homes.”


While you are here, we have a small ask.

More people are reading The Review than ever before — across our many platforms. So far, we have not put up a paywall to limit the stories you can read. We want to keep you in the news loop. But advertising revenues are increasingly going to the big two: you know who they are. If you value The Review’s independent, local community journalism, or you value the many ways we support dozens of community organizations in their endeavours, consider supporting our work. It takes time, effort and professional smarts to stay on top of community news and present well-researched, objective news articles on issues which matter to you.

If you read stories on this website, or you have come here from an Instant Article post on Facebook, think about subscribing. It would be a vote of confidence for the work that we do, and for the future well-being of your community.

Subscribe today?


 

Umaia Perlin

Umaia Perlin

Student Intern at The Review
Umaia is an aspiring writer working at The Review for the summer. She's thrilled to have a chance to learn about journalism hands-on! During the school year, she studies in Media Arts. For now, she's just excited to get to know The Review and everyone who contributes to it.
Umaia Perlin

Umaia Perlin

Umaia is an aspiring writer working at The Review for the summer. She's thrilled to have a chance to learn about journalism hands-on! During the school year, she studies in Media Arts. For now, she's just excited to get to know The Review and everyone who contributes to it.

umaia has 60 posts and counting.See all posts by umaia