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248 active cases of COVID-19, 72,257 people vaccinated across EOHU territory

There were 248 active cases of COVID-19 among residents of the jurisdiction of the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) as of Friday, May 7.

As of Friday, there were 16 COVID-19 patients in hospital across the EOHU’s territory and six of those patients were in intensive care.

There had been 104 deaths due to COVID-19 across the jurisdiction of the EOHU as of May 7.

Restrictions

The provincewide shutdown and stay-at-home order is to remain in effect for the entire province of Ontario. The Ontario-Québec boundary is also closed to all but the most essential traffic. The restrictions are in effect until May 20.  On Monday, Roumeliotis said his preference is to have the restrictions extended by four days to include the Victoria Day long weekend.

Ontario statistics

There were 3,166 new, active cases of COVID-19 across Ontario as of May 7. According to calculations based on statistics from the Ministry of Health, there were 33,645 active cases of COVID-19 across Ontario as of Friday.

There were 1,924 COVID-19 patients in hospital across Ontario as of Friday. Out of those patients, 788 were in intensive care, and 570 patients were on ventilators.

There had been 8,236 deaths due to COVID-19 across Ontario as of May 7, which was an increase of 23 deaths from May 6.

Vaccinations

As of May 7, 72,257 COVID-19 vaccine doses had been administered across the jurisdiction of the EOHU.

Effective April 30, COVID-19 vaccination appointments became available to all Ontario residents aged 55 and greater. On Thursday, May 6, appointments will become available to all individuals aged 50 and greater (born in 1971 or before).  Vaccination appointments will be available to all adults aged 18 and greater across Ontario by May 24.

Astra-Zeneca vaccine supplies at participating local pharmacies have not been replenished but the EOHU was expecting to get a better indication on Monday of when more will be delivered.

According to the EOHU, Moderna vaccines could instead be delivered to pharmacies.

The Pfizer vaccine has also been approved for youth aged 12 and older.

Across Ontario, 5,885,485 vaccine doses had been administered, and 387,484 Ontario residents had been fully vaccinated by receiving both required doses as of May 7.

Within the EOHU’s jurisdiction, Ontario residents 55 years of age and older may book a COVID-19 vaccine appointment using Ontario’s online booking system. In accordance with the latest recommendations, those booking will be given appointments for first and second doses, 16 weeks apart.

Provincial Online Booking System

Ontario’s vaccine booking system is accepting vaccine bookings for individuals who will be turning 50 or older in 2021 (born in 1971 or earlier) in 2021. Booking is available at www.Ontario.ca/bookvaccine. Individuals who require assistance with booking can call the Provincial Vaccine Information Line at 1-888-999-6488.

The booking system will screen for eligibility based on age using health card information. Appointments can be made by an individual or with the help of family or an informal caregiver (note: family/informal caregivers born after 1971 cannot book an appointment for themselves at this time, however, they may use the EOHU Pre-Registration tool to pre-register for an appointment).

If you have a family member or provide care to someone who was born in 1971 or before, please encourage them to get vaccinated. Vaccinations will be available BY APPOINTMENT ONLY at vaccine clinics being held across the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas, and Glengarry; the United Counties of Prescott-Russell; and the City of Cornwall. Alternate arrangements will be made for individuals who notify us of barriers preventing them from physically going to a clinic.

Stand by list

To avoid vaccine wastage by ensuring as many individuals as needed are available to receive remaining doses at the end of a clinic, the Eastern Ontario Health Unit (EOHU) is now extending the eligibility criteria for the standby list to individuals aged 18 or older who have not yet been able to book an appointment to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccination clinics throughout the EOHU region are operating efficiently and ethically to ensure that vaccine wastage is minimized. All vaccine doses at each site are planned for and allocated. Should doses remain at the end of a clinic due to missed or cancelled appointments, individuals on the standby list could be called in to receive the extra doses to avoid vaccine wastage at local clinics.

Institutional outbreaks

The following hospitals, long-term care, retirement residences, and group home facilities under EOHU jurisdiction also had COVID-19 outbreaks as of May 7:

St-Viateur Nursing Home in Limoges

Residence St-Mathieu in Hammond

Community Living-Lasalle in Cornwall

Earlier this week, Minister of Long-Term Care Merilee Fullerton announced that due to low COVID-19 infection rates at long-term care facilities, and high levels of COVID-19 vaccination in many long-term care homes, changes are being made to help resume communal dining and social activities for residents.

School closures

All schools in Ontario have switched to learning online indefinitely due to the significant number of new cases of COVID-19 among students in recent weeks.

EOHU COVID-19 case map, May 7, 2021

Map: Eastern Ontario Health Unit.

 

James Morgan

James Morgan is a freelance contributor. He has worked for several print and broadcast media outlets. James loves the history, natural beauty, and people of eastern Ontario and western Quebec.

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One thought on “248 active cases of COVID-19, 72,257 people vaccinated across EOHU territory

  • May 7, 2021 at 9:19 pm
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    Families may still have reason to worry over their loved-ones being left vulnerable by measures taken by some care-home business owners to maximize profits. It will always be a part of the materialistic nature of the beast.

    Like with some U.S. states, there was nursing home neglect in Canada before Covid-19, although the actual extent was made horrifically clear when the pandemic really hit. A most morbid example was the CHSLD Résidence Herron long-term care home in Quebec about 11 months ago, where 47 residents perished. The neglect had become so extreme that the Canadian Armed Forces got involved. Western business mentality and, by extension, collective society, allowed the well-being of our oldest family members to be decided by corporate profit-margin measures. And our governments mostly dared not intervene, perhaps because they feared being labelled as anti-business in our avidly capitalist culture.

    A common yet questionable refrain prevails among capitalist nation governments and corporate circles: Best business practices, including what’s best for the consumers, are best decided by business decision makers. Clearly evidenced by the many needless care-home deaths, big business does not always practice what’s best for its consumers, including the most vulnerable.

    (P.S. I must admire some non-Western cultures for their general practice of not placing their aged family members in seniors care homes.)

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