Installation of traffic signals completed on County Road 17 in Wendover

Council approves by-law to restore the speed limit to 90 km/h

At its monthly meeting on November 28, 2018, the United Counties of Prescott and Russell (UCPR) council adopted a by-law required to restore the speed limit to 90 km/h along County Road 17 in the Wendover area.

This decision was made following the installation of traffic lights at the intersection of County Road 17 and County Road 19 (Du Quai Road), which was completed on November 15. The by-law also stipulates that the speed limit be reduced to 80 km/h for a distance of 350 metres to the east and 450 metres to the west of the intersection, as a road safety measure.

“We would like to thank residents and motorists for their understanding and patience during this temporary period. As has been said many times, the safety of our citizens will always be council’s top priority,” stated François St-Amour, Warden of the UCPR, adding that many concerns have been expressed in recent years regarding the need to improve this intersection.

“The traffic lights operate on a sensor-based system, meaning that the lights along County Road 17 will remain green, uninterrupted, until such time that a vehicle arrives at the intersection along County Road 19 with the intention of turning or crossing,” explained Marc Clermont, Public Works Director for the UCPR. “As such, the new configuration will not require the creation of new turning lanes along County Road 17.”

This past spring, County Council decided to temporarily reduce the posted speed limit in this sector from 90 km/h to 70 km/h, until the traffic signals were installed, as is presently the case in other sections of County Road 17.

Over the years, the UCPR Emergency Services Department has responded to several road accidents at this intersection, involving serious injuries, many of which were a result of excessive speed.


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Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Publisher at The Review
Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!
Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule

Louise Sproule has been the publisher of The Review since 1992. A part-time job after high school at The Review got Sproule hooked on community newspapers and all that they represent. She loves to write, has covered every kind of event you can think of, loves to organize community events and loves her small town and taking photographs across the region. She dreams of writing a book one day so she can finally tell all of the town's secrets! She must be stopped! Keep subscribing to The Review . . . or else!

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