Number of UCPR employees on Ontario ‘sunshine list’ doubles in five years

(Unless otherwise specified, the figures cited in this story reflect salary not including benefits.)

The number of people at the United Counties of Prescott and Russell making at least $100,000 a year has doubled in the last five years.

In 2013, 14 UCPR employees were on Ontario’s so-called “sunshine list,” which names public sector employees bringing in a minimum $100,000 annual salary.

In late March, the province released its 2017 list and 30 UCPR employees are named.

Chief Administrative Officer, Stéphane Parisien, is consistently at the top. Last year, his salary was just under $210,000—about $35,500 more than it was five years ago. The largest hike came between 2014 and 2015 where his salary increased by about $13,000.

By comparison, Timothy Simpon, the CAO of the United Counties of Stormont, Dundas and Glengarry (SDG), had an annual salary of about $171,000. Maureen Adams, Cornwall’s CAO, made just over $192,500 last year.

In 2017, the UCPR’s total cost for salaries totaled $27.9 million and benefits, $7.5 million. Combined, they make up about 87 per cent of the total county tax levy. The number of employees at the UCPR also varied between 485 and 510 depending on seasonal hiring.

As a quick note, only three SDG employees are on the list. Treasurer, Vanessa Metcalfe, said in an email this is because, “SDG contracts with the City of Cornwall to provide various services.” Some of those include Social Services, Social Housing and Emergency Medical Services. Cornwall has 132 employees on the list, 68 of which are with police services including the top earner being Chief of Police Daniel Parkinson at $199,000.

For a more exhaustive list of local municipalities, see here.

Other ‘listees’ in Eastern Ontario

The Eastern Ontario Health Unit’s CEO, Paul Roumeliotis, raked in $327,400, more than double the second-highest earning director at the EOHU.

Other health professionals were well represented on the list.

Marc Leboutillier, CEO of Hawkesbury General Hospital, made $217,800 and was the highest earner of its 49 employees on the list. Geneviève Arturi, the hospital’s director of its new Mental Health and Addictions centre, made $120,200.

Valoris also had 22 employees on the list with Executive Director Hélène Fournier being at the top, earning $168,100.

Finally, 608 employees from the four school boards in the region made the list. Conseil scolaire de district catholique de l’Est ontarien had the fewest at 74 with François Turpin, director of education, at the top making $182,300. The Conseil des Écoles Publique de l’Est de l’Ontario had 115 employees, its director of education services (separate from director of education), Claude Deschamps, making $189,300. The two English school boards each had more staff on the list with 155 from the Catholic District School Board of Eastern Ontario and a staggering 264 from the Upper Canada District School Board. William Gartland, CDSBEO’s director of education, and Stephen Sliwa, his counterpart of UCDSB, brought in $209,500 and $219,000, respectively.

Government glut

The entire list includes 131,500 people, about 28 times more than when it was first introduced in 1996. Jeff Lyash, CEO of Ontario Power Generation, is at the top of the list and made about $1.6 million off the public dime.

The provincial government says the $100,000 threshold hasn’t kept up with inflation, which according to the Bank of Canada, would equate to $147,000 in last year’s dollars.

Regardless, many say $100,000 is still worthy to disclose, especially considering the average wages in Ontario last year $993 a week, about $51,600 (assuming no time off).


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